Spring walk, Trial Bay, after the burning

We went to see the Dagger Hakea in bloom across the hills sides, but were a little early )13th Sept). And there had been a large backburning operation.

Backburn_Trial Bay_

Trial Bay after Back burn

Caught a sniff of the cinnamon scent that will dominate in a week, just a few flowers of Dagger Hakea (Hakea teretifoliaout).

Dagger hakea_Trial Bay

Fire is an important element in maintaining the health of many Australian landscapes/ habitats.  Species of Casuarina, Hakea, Banksia, Leptospermum and Eucalyptus are encased in woody capsules that may house dozens of seeds or just a pair as with Hakea. The woody capsules are tough and can remain dormant for years.

Dagger Hakea, after fire, Trial Bay

Dagger Hakea, fire has sprung the seeds, the parent plant has died.

Backburn_Trial Bay_2

We are still learning how to learn from Aboriginal fire stick farming.

Backburn_Trial Bay

Banksia missing the fire

The fruiting bodies Banksia include numerous hard follicles which open after fire spreading seeds which then germinates in an ash bed rich in nutrients.

Banksia catching the fire

The walks was wonderful with Satin Flycatchers fluttering just above our heads, and eight whales close in moving south fast, one breaching and another showing its tail.

And at night we went into our forest after someone had told us the fireflies were out. It was a humid night with rain forecast and at dusk the fireflies put on a spectacular show, many more than last year and a week earlier. These carnivorous beetles have a two year life cycle.